Inca Jungle Trek 4Days/ 3Nights

Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek
Inca Jungle Trek

Inca Jungle Trek 4Days/ 3Nights

  • This trek includes a tour led by an experienced guide around Machu Picchu

  • Experience water rafting in the Urubamba River and zip lining in the jungle

  • Enjoy the thermal baths of Cocalmayo

ONLINE BOOKING IS CURRENTLY NOT AVAILABLE ON FINDLOCALTRIPS.COM FOR TOURS OF MACHU PICCHU DUE TO GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS ON TICKET SALES, MOST OTHER TOURS ARE AVAILABLE TO BOOK HERE ONLINE. PLEASE CONTACT THE OPERATOR DIRECTLY TO RESERVE YOUR MACHU PICCHU TOUR AND MENTION FINDLOCALTRIPS.COM SENDING THEM A LINK TO THIS PAGE TO ENSURE YOU GET THE BEST PRICE AS SHOWN HERE.

AVAILABILITY

All year round except February

DURATION

4 days/3 nights

START LOCATION

Cuzco hotel and hostel pickup

END LOCATION

The site of Machu Picchu

OPERATOR NAME

LORENZO EXPEDITIONS

ONLINE BOOKING NOT AVAILABLE

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

DAY 1: CUSCO - SANTA MARIA: BIKING & RAFTING (34 MILES, 55 KM)

The tour begins at 6am. You’ll be taken to Lorenzo’s Lodge where we serve the first breakfast (buffet style; included in the tour). After, you’ll continue in our private van for 3 hours until you arrive at the Malaga Pass (4,316 metres above sea level).

This is where you’ll start the bike tour down the mountain. Your guide will give a quick, informative briefing and provide all riders with the appropriate safety gear, before the 3-hour mountain descent (about 34 miles or 55 km) to the town of Huamanmarca. From there, you’ll continue the journey by bus for approximately 30 minutes, until reaching the town of Santa Maria. Here, you can enjoy lunch, and spend the first night in a basic hostel.

During this part of the journey, you’ll experience the beauty of the snow-capped mountains and their fast-changing climate, from a dry cold to a humid heat. Upon arrival to Santa Maria, you’ll have the option to go rafting* (level III and IV, during April to November) in the Urubamba River, which crosses through part of the jungle. The rafting price (100 Soles) is not included in the tour.

*OPTIONAL: RAFTING, 100 SOLES, OPEN FROM APRIL TO NOVEMBER.

DAY 2: SANTA MARIA - SANTA TERESA: TREKKING (14 MILES, 23 KM)

After a delicious breakfast, at 6am you’ll begin the first day of the trekking course to Santa Teresa. The first part of the tour is an ascent of around 2 hours, but there will be various stops in order to learn a bit more about the rich variety of flora and fauna that can be found in the region. One of these breaks will be at a family house, where you can rest for 20 minutes and top up your water supplies, as well as trying some regional tropical fruit.

After some time-out, you’ll cross a section of the Inca Trail that historically connected Machu Picchu with the city of Vilcabamba. Here, our guide will explain a bit more about the history of the Incas, as well as the communication system that existed during that time. At this point, you’ll also see one of the most impressive views in the Huancarccasa Canyon.

You’ll descend to the small town of Quellomayo, where there’ll be a lunch-stop and time for a breather in the near-by hammocks. This will be followed by 2 more hours on foot to the thermal baths of Cocalmayo, where you’ll have plenty of time to enjoy the naturally heated water of these pools. After bathing, you’ll continue to the final destination of the day, Santa Teresa, and spend your second night in a basic hostel.

DAY 3: SANTA TERESA - AGUAS CALIENTES: ZIP-LINING & TREKKING (10 MILES, 16 KM)

Today, there's the option of doing canopy zip-lining for 100 soles (not included). Otherwise, you’ll begin the trekking course to Aguas Calientes at approximately 7am. It’s a 3 hour walk through the Aobamba Valley, until you reach the Intihuatana area, where you’ll pass a government control post and continue the trek.

Lunch will be included along the way, and you’ll have the opportunity to see a series of waterfalls, and admire the splendour of the mountains surrounding Machu Picchu and Huayna Picchu. Look out for the astronomical sundial used by the Incas, as well as the Incan citadel of Machu Picchu.

You’ll walk for 2 to 3 more hours alongside train tracks, which will lead you to the town of Aguas Calientes where you’ll spend the night.

DAY 4: AGUAS CALIENTES - MACHU PICCHU

This is the day that everybody has been waiting for – today you’ll see one of the 7 Wonders of the World! It’s a very early start, allowing time to arrive and watch the sun rise over the Inca city of Machu Picchu.

You’ll begin the ascent from Aguas Calientes to Machu Picchu at 4.30am, with the option of hiking the 1,500 Incan steps or paying a $12 bus fare to reach the citadel. Once inside the site, your guide will provide a 2-hour tour of the ruins, as well as the most important temples within the ancient city. After, you’ll be free to explore Machu Picchu yourself, and maybe even hike Huayna Picchu** or Machu Picchu Mountain**.

In your own time, you’ll need to return to Aguas Calientes (via stairs or bus) in order to take a return train to Ollantaytambo or Cusco.

** Previous reservations are needed with two months of anticipation, plus a fee of $15. There are only 400 entrance tickets per day to climb these two mountains.

TOUR TICKETS (MAY VARY BY DATE)
Ticket Price(USD)
ADULT 269.00 (USD)
TOUR DOCUMENTS
INCA JUNGLE TRAIL 4D/3D - ITINERARY Download
TOUR ITINERARY

DAY 1: 6.00AM

PICK UP (LOCATION WILL BE CONFIRMED THE DAY BEFORE YOUR TOUR STARTS)


DAY 1:

BREAKFAST BUFFET AT LORENZO'S LODGE


DAY 1:

MOUNTAIN BIKING


DAY 1:

LUNCH IN SANTA MARIA


DAY 1:

OPTIONAL RAFTING IN URUBAMBA RIVER


DAY 1:

DINNER & OVERNIGHT IN SANTA MARIA


DAY 2:

BREAKFAST IN SANTA MARIA


DAY 2: 6.30AM

BEGIN TREKKING


DAY 2:

LUNCH IN QUELLOMAYO


DAY 2:

HOT SPRINGS


DAY 2:

DINNER & OVERNIGHT IN SANTA TERESA


DAY 3:

BREAKFAST


DAY 3: 7.00AM

BEGIN TREKKING OR ZIP-LINING


DAY 3:

LUNCH AT INKA RAKAY


DAY 3:

TREK TO AGUAS CALIENTES


DAY 3:

DINNER & OVERNIGHT IN AGUAS CALIENTES


DAY 4: 4.30AM

START ASCENT TO MACHU PICCHU


DAY 4:

GUIDED TOUR OF MACHU PICCHU


INCLUDED

- Transfer from our office at 6.00am to Lorenzo´s Lodge (breakfast point)
- The coolest T-shirts from our company
- Mini-bus to Santa María or biking point
- Bikes and full safety equipment
- All meals, except on Day 4 (3 breakfasts, 3 lunches and 3 dinners)
- 3 nights’ accommodation (Santa Maria, Santa Teresa, and Aguas Calientes)
- An experienced, bilingual “Adventure Guide”
- Entrance to Machu Picchu
- Guided Tour in and around Machu Picchu

NOT INCLUDED

- Train tickets to return to Cusco
- Last lunch in Machu Picchu
- Bus to Machu Picchu (one way $12.00)
- Entrance fee to Huayna Picchu Mountain

RECOMMENDED

- Small backpack
- Polar jacket or fleece
- Good trekking shoes or boots
- Rain poncho (or rain jacket)
- Bathing suit, sandals, and towels
- Insect repellent
- T-shirts and shorts
- Sun block, sun glasses and hat
- Flashlight
- Personal medicine
- Original passport

CANCELLATION POLICY

No booking available at the time.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
  1. I cannot find my accommodation listed in the operator pick up locations when making my booking. What should I select?

    This operator only offers pick-ups from the hotel and hostel accommodation listed, this covers over 90% of the accommodation providers in the area. They do not provide pick-ups or drop-offs at private residences, Airbnbs, bus terminals etc. Select an alternative close by and be ready there for pick-up at the time on your booking confirmation

  2. What is the difference between Salkantay and the Inca Jungle Trek?

    Salkantay is full-on trekking, whereas the Inca Jungle mixes trekking, rafting, mountain biking and other activities.

  3. How physically fit do I need to be?

    The Inca Jungle Trek can range in difficulty, however most are classified as a moderate level. The Machu Picchu complex itself is not difficult, and most people do not have any problems.

  4. How do I avoid altitude sickness?

    Take Soroche (Diamox) pills, eat small meals, drink coca tea, drink lots of water, and avoid alcohol (it’s a dehydrator). The best way to avoid altitude sickness is to acclimatize yourself. The recommended approach for acclimatization is to ascend gradually, spending at least 24 hours at every 2,000ft increase in altitude.

  5. What are the symptoms of altitude sickness?

    Common symptoms of altitude sickness (sometimes called acute mountain sickness) can be similar to a bad hangover, and may include headache, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, tiredness, loss of appetite and shortness of breath. A severe headache (that is not relieved by medication), nausea and vomiting, and increasing fatigue or shortness of breath may indicate more serious problems – seek medical attention.

  6. Are there any student discounts?

    Yes, there is a student discount. These discounts are only valid if you have an ISIC card and it matches your passport. They are very strict with this. You must bring your original I.D. to enter Machu Picchu.

  7. Where is Machu Picchu?

    Machu Picchu is near a town called Aguas Calientes or Machu Picchu Town. From there, it is a 1.5 hour hike up steps, or a 20-minute bus ride to the complex itself.

  8. Where is Huayna (Wayna) Picchu?

    Huayna Picchu Mountain is the peak located to the north of Machu Picchu citadel. It is the backdrop to the classic image of Machu Picchu. The peak offers inspiring views of the ruins and 360° views of the area. The climb to the summit takes 45 minutes, it is a challenging trek and is very steep in parts. Limited to 400 a day, tickets must be purchased as a combo ticket at the same time as your entrance to Machu Picchu. This ticket cannot be purchased separately and is always in high demand. It costs approximately $10 extra.

  9. What is Machu Picchu Mountain?

    Machu Picchu Mountain is the peak located to the south-west of Machu Picchu citadel. The trek offers unparalleled sights of the ruins and panoramic views of the surrounding scenery. The trek is wide and well-marked. It is a moderate/challenging trek and takes 90 minutes to ascend. Limited to 800 a day, tickets must be purchased as a combo ticket at the same time as your entrance to Machu Picchu. This ticket cannot be purchased separately. It costs around $5 extra.

  10. What are the hours of operation?

    The site is open daily from 6am until 5pm. It’s open every day of the year, including public holidays, Christmas and New Year.

  11. Why is the train so expensive?

    Peru Rail and Inca Rail are the two operators which have a duopoly on the route, so they can maintain very high prices.

  12. Where can I leave my bags?

    You can leave your bags at your Cusco hostel/hotel. Note, if you take the train there are bag restrictions.

  13. Is the bus from Aguas Calientes to Machu Picchu worth it?

    The walk up to Machu Picchu can be seen as part of the experience. However, the bus is an option for those who are tired after a long trek, or who just want to save their energy for all the walking at the top.

  14. What kind of weather can we find in Machu Picchu?

    Machu Picchu is at a lower altitude level than Cusco. It contains part of the jungle, and the rains are present during all seasons. During the hottest days, the temperature can reach approximately 26° Celsius (79ºF), and during the cool, early mornings, the temperature can drop to -2° C (-36ºF). The best months to visit Machu Picchu are May and June, since they are the mildest ones.

  15. Will I have problems with altitude sickness on this tour?

    Altitude sickness can catch many travellers a little bit off guard. Not everyone gets sick in high altitudes, and it is difficult to predict who is likely to be badly affected by it. For most people, it is nothing more than a headache and a dizzy sensation that diminishes over a short period of time, 1 to 2 days for most people. If you want to limit your chances of getting sick, there are a few things you can do. Firstly, do not fly directly into high altitude - proceed slowly, allowing your body time to acclimatise as you ascend gradually. However, for many that is not possible, so it’s important to drink lots of water, and to slow down! This sounds simple, but both of these things are very important. Your body is struggling because you don’t have enough oxygen, so avoiding any strenuous activity is a good idea. Chew some coca leaves - the native people of South America have been chewing coca for centuries, thanks to its ability to alleviate mild altitude sickness symptoms. Coca leaves can be bought in any supermarket, and even souvenir shops or street stalls. Take altitude sickness pills (Soroche): these are sold over the counter all over Peru and Bolivia, and are just a few dollars. If you are flying straight into altitude over 2500metres without spending any time at an intermediate elevation, and you’re worried about getting sick, you can ask your doctor for more specific and stronger altitude sickness medication in advance. In the rare case that your symptoms are more severe than a headache and mild dizziness, you should descend in altitude and seek medical assistance.

EXTRA INFORMATION FROM FINDLOCALTRIPS.COM

Our Rating:

our comments:

A really amazing experience!

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